Category Archives: OM Diagnosis

Ocular Melanoma in the News

Ocular Melanoma Liver Metastasis Pathway
Ocular melanoma is a rare cancer, with an incidence of approximately 7 cases per million population per year. In the UK there are 4 supra-regionally funded …

Quality of Life – Retirement: A Full-Time Job
Yesterday, I learned more about ocular melanoma than I’ve ever known before. This article in the New York Times brought back all those memories and gave …

NY Times Article on Genetic Testing to OM. | Melanoma Research
Some people are starting to talk about “living with” Stage 4 ocular melanoma as a possibility. If tumors are detected early, and treated, maybe one can live long …

CE | 20/20 Magazine
Severed optic nerves, ocular melanoma, detached retinas, pterygia, orbital fractures…these are some of the catastrophic injuries and diseases that occur when …

Novel Technique Shows Promise for Ocular Melanoma

Percutaneous hepatic perfusion could be useful for colon, neuroendocrine cancers

Stockholm — Mature data from an ongoing trial of percutaneous hepatic perfusion (PHP)— a novel technique in which chemotherapy is infused directly into the liver—continue to show improved progression-free survival (PFS) for patients with liver metastases from ocular melanoma.

Researchers say the PHP technique could be used to treat other tumors that cause liver metastases, such as neuroendocrine or colon, if trials yield positive results. This news comes from a study reported by investigators from the University of Pittsburgh at the 2011 European Multidisciplinary Cancer Congress (EMCC).

“This is the first treatment to show a clinical benefit in patients with liver metastases from ocular melanoma,” said lead investigator James Pingpank, MD, professor of surgery at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and a surgical oncologist with UPMC Cancer Centers.

Read the complete article here

After Vancouver: January 14, 2012

My new prosthetic eye

My new prosthetic eye

I have returned from Vancouver with my new prosthetic eye.

As much as the enucleation was painful the replacement of my eye with the prosthetic has raised my spirits again. It is impossible to describe the joy I have of looking into a mirror and seeing a perfectly matched pair of eyes after so many years and so much disfigurement. Look carefully, if this is your first visit to my blog can you even tell which eye was removed?

My ocularist and her staff have created the impossible and I don’t think I’ll ever be able to fully repay the team that has cared for me for so long and to such a conclusion.

Well, it’s not really over. I am still a cancer survivor with a high likelyhood of metastasis. But I feel great now and I will live the life that has been denied to me for so long.

I am no longer the “half-zombie”, scaring youngsters in the aisles of the grocery stores and watching people as they see my face and look away or try to not seem affected by the incomplete prosthetic that almost feels like I was wearing it forever instead of the 5 months that it was.

Thank you all!

Vancouver 2012 Prosthetic Appointments Have Arrived

Red eye, blue eye, will lead to something completely different.

Red eye, blue eye

After a miserable series of occurances (detailed in previous posts) am have finally healed well enough to travel since my enucleation and following appendectomy surgeries in August 2011.

Tonight is my first night at the Park Inn. I’ll have a nice sleep then wake early and have breakfast, eggs, bacon and toast with a liberal number of coffees.

Then it’s off to my first of 5 appointment over the next two days to have my eye fitted with my new life-like prosthetic.

When this series of appointments is over I will post pictures of my new left eye. I’m sure the people at work will be happy to see the “zombie” finally put to rest.

I'll sleep well tonight

Wish me luck!